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Researchers at the University of New Hampshire surveyed 1,560 children and caregivers, reporting that only 2.5 percent of respondents had sent, received or created sexual pictures distributed via cell phone in the previous year.Perhaps shedding light on the over-reporting of earlier studies, the researchers found that the figure rose to 9.6% when the definition was broadened from images prosecutable as child pornography to any suggestive image, not necessarily nude ones.Snapchat appeals to teens because it allows users to send photos for a maximum of ten seconds before they self-destruct.Those sending photos over Snapchat believe they will disappear without consequences so they feel more secure about sending them.As a result of sexting being a relatively recent practice, ethics are still being established by both those who engage in it and those who create legislation based on this concept.

In a 2013 study conducted by Drouin et al., it was found that sexting is also associated with attachment styles, as those with attachment avoidance are more likely to engage in sexting behaviours (just as these individuals are also more likely to engage in casual sex).Fifteen percent of these teens also claimed to have received sexually explicit photos.This suggests a consent issue of people receiving photos without asking for them.These applications claim no responsibility for explicit messages or photos that are saved.Snapchat's privacy policy on sexting has evolved to include sending content over new smartphone applications because of their appealing features such as the anonymity or temporary elements.

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